The Cooper Colour Code System

The Cooper Colour Code system was invented by US Marine Jeff Cooper.  It relates to the degree of peril you are willing to do something about and which allows you to move from one level of mindset to another to enable you to properly handle a given situation. It is a fantastic tool which is used by Military, Law Enforcement and Professional Security and Self Defence agencies throughout the world. As a professional bodyguard this system is extremely valuable whether providing security for an individual, for oneself or for ones family.

The Cooper Colour code system Explained

COOPER COLOUR  CODE WHITE:

No awareness – not paying any attention to people around you or your surroundings. You are a potential victim.

Example 1 – Walking along with your head down and iPod playing.

Example 2 – Generally having no real awareness or anticipation that there are any potential threats.

“The world is a kind and friendly place”!

When to be in code white:

You should only be in code white when you are at home with your feet up, watching TV with all doors and windows locked, and the alarm active. You should not be in code white at any other time.

COOPER COLOUR CODE YELLOW:

You are aware of the people around you and your surroundings. There is no specific threat identified but your mindset should be “the world is a potentially unfriendly place and I have to be on the lookout for potential threats”. This doesn’t mean you have to be paranoid. Just be aware.

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Controlling Fear is an important and often overlooked aspect of self defence. In this article we hope to provide the martial artist or RBSD trainer with some insight into the chemical responses your body will go through during this process.

There are main five factors dictating how severely the Sympathetic Nervous System will take over

In other words, the 5 things that will dictate your fear response.

  1. The severity of the perceived threat
  2. How much time you have available to respond
  3. Your confidence in your skills and training
  4. Level of experience in dealing with the threat
  5. The amount of physical fatigue combined with present anxiety 

The Predator Vs the Victim

The predator chooses the time, place and the victim. This puts them in an excellent position biologically as the predator will subconciously work themselves up or down into the optimal performance zone of 115 – 145 beats per minute heart rate range.

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